Death By Covid-19


The current global figures show that 817,619 people have succumbed to Covid-19 infection.

And some countries are of the opinion that not all those deaths occurred solely due to Covid-19 infection. For example:

73% of COVID-19 deaths in India are people with comorbidities

This is completely stupid.

Say, if a person has had a history of Malaria, and then happens to die in an accident, should his past condition be considered as a cause of death?

Every person has some health issue or another. But when one tests positive for Covid-19 and succumbs to it, that person dies due to that infection. Not some past condition.

Other health issues do certainly play a role in making that particular patient’s condition better or worse, but you can’t say that he/she died because of the combordities.

And speaking of deaths by Covid-19, we should also consider those who are dying because of the pandemic, indirectly.

Woman kills disabled son, takes her life after husband dies of Covid-19

Many have also died of hunger.

They certainly didn’t die because of the infection, but they did die because of the pandemic.

Collateral Damages!

After the 9/11, there was ‘Islamophobia‘ in the United States. Every single Muslim, who hadn’t done anything wrong whatsoever, was suspected and feared.

What kind of people are you to think that what US did was the right thing to do and considering the indirect deaths by Covid-19 is preposterous!

P.S. Everybody lies!

Categories: Medical Science

49 replies

  1. Ya aren’t lying 🤥! You are telling us the Absolute Truth! 23K+ Muslim-looking individuals were Never Accounted For! Poofs…Evaporations. What happened to ya? Wives and Children STILL ASK! Truths are not lies! 23 Thousand ARAB 👀 GONE! I saw with my eyes on 125th Street White clad faithfuls @1128AM being punched as Arab store owners were closing shop. Ya terrible day I walked home 3 miles or so that day. I was glad Black folks weren’t involved because I feared the worst. 25 thousand people disappeared 👻

    Liked by 1 person

  2. in England they have been doing the same. if you have had Covid and recover and 6 months later you die in a car crash it is put down as covid. i went to hospital because i couldn’t breath properly. i was severely anemic. they tested me for covid and even though i was negative i was still put in a single room and treated as a covid patient. it’s so wrong and gives false figures.

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    • Dave, I didn’t interpret the post the same way you did. Politicians have been trying to minimize the coronavirus for economic and political reasons. In fact, more people are dying directly or indirectly from the virus than are being accredited to the virus. Nor is a negative test proof of not having the virus. Negative results currently are only 65% accurate, not much better than flipping a coin. In treating you as if you had the virus even with a negative test, the hospital was being correctly prudent.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Co-morbidities are a risk factor for severe disease, not a cause of the severe form of Covid-19, nor the cause of death. Unfortunately, people don’t understand this. And anyway, we’re under counting deaths due to Covid19. I’m certain SARS-COV-2 isn’t partial to Indians. Our number are way off, a complete outlier which indicates we’re fudging data (death rates). It’s not like we have exceptional healthcare infrastructure nor are most of our population nutritionally healthy, to be able to pull off such low number of deaths compared to other countries.

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    • There’s another thing that might occur. A second wave of delayed deaths due to Pulmonary Fibrosis that’s developing in a high percentage of people who’ve recovered from the Acute Infection.

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      • That would certainly happen. Also, as the number of cases keep increasing, India’s top-notch medical facilities will start to crumble. And that would lead to a whole different class of chaos.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m surprised that isn’t already happening. I think NEET/JEE is going to turn into such a disaster. Can you imagine the chaos these exams are going to cause. I’m so furious at the moment. Even one life lost due to irresponsible decisions is one too many. I mean 18, 19 year olds have their entire life in front of them. What do they mean by “careers being hampered”?

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      • Don’t agree with that though. Most of the basic science books for MBBS are to lay the basic foundations. During our Residency, we don’t just read textbooks. We have read publications and be up to date with the Recent Advances. Most people I’ve worked with are genuinely good and competent doctors. As for Engineers, I don’t know many, so shall not judge.

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      • Nope. But I still think most (not all) doctors in India are quite competent and very hardworking. Yes, not everyone is a genius. But, imo, that’s perfectly okay. Plus Indian doctors in most hospitals do not have at their disposal an arsenal of the latest investigative procedures and most people cannot pay for those investigations. So Clinicians have to depend very heavily on Clinical acumen.

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      • India does lack on the equipment front. I agree. But the doctors need to be more intrigued and fascinated.
        It’s good to know about viral, bacterial and fungal infections.
        But it would also be good if they knew about diseases like Erdheim-Chester, Degos disease, Huges Stovin and if they were more open minded to problems like Asperger’s.

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      • Believe me, we’re all always intrigued and fascinated whenever we come across something that is rare. But it isn’t possible to remember all the information about every condition. Hence we’re more familiar with what we see more frequently.

        You should check this out https://youtu.be/QAgYMSUUYAM

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      • It is possible to remember all the information. I do! I worked as a diagnostician for 6 months. My only problem is, I don’t work well with others. And when things aren’t interesting, I don’t work at all.

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      • You might be able to, but I know from my own experience that I can’t. I always have to refer and read when cases aren’t clear cut, when all the pieces don’t fall into an exact sequence. That is Medicine. The human body is fascinating. 2 people with the same condition with present with very different symptoms & signs, 2 people with the same condition might respond to the same treatment very differently, 2 people with different conditions might present with similar symptoms and signs. I wouldn’t trust a doctor who says they know everything and don’t need to refer and read up sometimes to solve conditions that have puzzling presentations. Or even classic presentations but are rare and the doctor has seen only a handful of cases.

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      • Well, I never said I don’t read. I read and learn everyday. All I said was, I remember everything I have ever read.
        And I do know how medicine works.

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      • Good for you then. You’re one of the lucky people who doesn’t have to work as hard as the rest of us. But to say all Indian doctors are incompetent because they don’t remember everything they’ve ever read is unfair to the hard working people who’re doing their best and even if they have to work harder, they come up with the answers. I don’t remember everything I’ve ever read. It’s just too much information and I cannot remember everything. I’ll remember the salient features but not enough. But enough to know what I need to read about, which possible conditions I need to rule out etc etc. There are probably a zillion entities I am yet to hear of or read about.

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      • You don’t have to be lucky for that. You just have to be brilliant and stubborn.
        I understand that not everyone can have an eidetic memory. But the more one reads and learns each day, the better one gets.
        The first book one should read is, ‘Manual of The Operations of Surgey’ by Joseph Bell.

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      • Well, not everyone is brilliant either. But most of us are hard working and all of us read a lot. Esp us in Pathology. But try picking put Rosia Ackermann & Sternberg for General Surgical Path, Fletcher for Oncopathology, WHO Manuals for System wise Oncopathology, Robins for Gen Path, Greys/Koss & Orell for Cytolopathology, + Bethesda for PAP & Thyroid Pathology, McKenzie for Clinical Laboratory Hematology, Weedon/Lever for Dermatopathology + the medical journals (as many as you can) for Recent Advances + a couple of other books for blood bank and forensic medicine…. This is the minimum we have to read for our MD.

        I know I can’t remember everything I read from all of these books and journals. Of course I don’t consider myself brilliant. But I do consider myself hard working and competent and I know my limitations.

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      • Like I said, it’s amazing that you have a double PhD & that you are able to remember everything that you read. But it’s also okay to not remember everything. Not remembering everything doesn’t make anyone incompetent. Should know the basics, should be able to pick up the clues, should be observant and should be able to put the clues together in a logical way, refer and come up with the best possible diagnosis. Again medical sciences is not an exact science. Perhaps one day it’ll be, when we’ve solved all the riddles in our genome. Until then, there are a lot of shades of grey, a lot of cases you can’t always fit into an exact diagnosis, lots of variables that we won’t know until all the riddles in the molecular level are solved. We still have a long way to go to get there.

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      • I’ve been reading your posts. For me, the only reality I am sure of is that I exist, even if the entire universe is nothing but a hologram, and we’re just some kind of a projection of energy, just the fact that I have thoughts, feelings, an opinion means I exists, from my point of view. At this moment, as long as I can feel and I have a brain that functions, I exist.

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      • Again, this is an opinion and we can debate on this, but until we can prove that we exist or vice versa, they’re all theories that we’re debating. I’m not putting forth my opinion as the absolute truth 😊

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      • So many things that was thought to be the absolute truth at certain phases in history, we now know weren’t exactly the truth. Truth is always evolving because there’s so much we still don’t know.

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    • I can accept a certain amount of partiality.
      Theoretically, as I stated in my first detailed paper, the SARS-COV2 has the ability to mutate at genetic level. Mutation occurs within the 100 dormant genes lying in our DNA. Given India’s state of health care and all the diseases we are exposed to, most of those viruses happen to be what we have built an immunity towards.
      The figures are still off because of the fact that we aren’t ready to accept that SARS-COV2 can affect us. And the fact that government wants to, for some reason, be optimistic.
      Nothing shouts ‘Medicine’ more than ‘Optimism’.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re right about a certain degree of immunity our population might have to the novel virus bc we’re exposed to so many infectious agents. But our numbers are just very off. I’m having a hard time trusting our data. I genuinely think we’re under counting.

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      • No. Not at all. Our government isn’t doing that deliberately. It’s just that, we have certain disorders leading most of our population to believe in what isn’t and do what one shouldn’t.
        For example; I know a person who was infected with Covid-19. Died before he could be admitted. Was sent home by the Doctors who stated the reason of his death to be ‘Cardiac Arrest’ just so they wouldn’t have to go through all the required paper work.

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      • I wouldn’t know about that. Two possible reasons for that. One that our doctor-patient ratios are off. So most doctors are over worked, esp if this is a teaching hospital where Residents have to do everything. The other possibility is that if it’s a Govt Hosp, there’s a lot of pressure from the Health Ministers usually. Both my parents were HODs. My dad took voluntary retirement because he isn’t someone who’d do something unethical under pressure. My mom’s constantly under pressure all the time. There was an incident when many people developed endophthalmitis because the health minister forced the Dept to do more surgeries than the OT could handle inspite of objections from the doctors because the Govt at the time was promoting some healthcare scheme. A lot of politics are being played in the background.

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      • Well the reason Indian Doctors are incompetent is because no one here is willing to take that extra step. No one is willing to break a rule or two.
        I learnt the that diagnosing a patient is as much an art as it is science.
        Sometimes, you just know where to look and what to look for.
        But our system is too orthodox. No one wants to grow or evolve or take a risk.

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      • I would take exception to calling Indian doctors incompetent. I know a whole lot of very competent, hard-working, risk taking doctors. They have to take risks because they cannot always confirm their diagnoses with all the required investigative procedures. I’ve worked in the US. Trust me Indian doctors take more risk than most doctors in the US, who follow the SOP for most diagnoses because of the problems of lawsuit. Doctors in the US are more reluctant to think out of the box and break aways from SOPs than Doctors in India. This has been my experience.

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      • You always have to rule out the more common possibilities before you venture into the uncommon territory. That is the golden rule of Medicine.

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      • It’s a rule for a reason. The patient comes first. You don’t want to miss a common condition while you’re searching for something rare. Rare conditions cannot be your 1st differential. They can be in your differential but you have to have to rule out the more likely conditions.

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      • I never entertained a patient on his arrival. I don’t like that. That is too boring.
        A patient is only interesting if a few doctors have given up on him/her and have performed all the regular tests.

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      • That might be how you approach Medicine. My approach is very different. Doesn’t matter to me if it’s a regular uninteresting case or something that’s a rate entity. If I’ve correctly made the diagnosis and contributed in the right manner to the patient’s care, I’m happy. Of course if I diagnose a rare condition, it’s exciting. That is a bonus. I’m a Pathologist. So I don’t treat patients directly. But if I’m able to point the clinician in the right direction, I’m happy.

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      • I have already figured that out. I just wanted to put across the point of view of a doctor who isn’t brilliant but is still competent.

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      • From my point of view, there is still a long way to go for doctors, engineers, as well as scientists to be at the level of excellency.
        Exploring unknown realms and considering unimaginable theories is way cooler than the normal.

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  4. Here in Indonesia, the government kept pushing the “new normal” notion, leading to the rapid increment, it’s now up to 700+ cases a day with >20% positivity rate (means, the number could be higher if there’re more tests conducted). Even with this current rate and with many hospitals closed due to the over-capacity, people become more and more negligent. Some people still not using masks and people often gather around in a closed space. At this rate, we’re pushing the “herb immunity”; but at what cost? I honestly have no idea.

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  5. So sad.. But I’m thankful for the wonderful hope that God gives us from the bible.

    Isaiah:25:8-He will swallow up death forever, and the sovereign lord Jehovah will wipe away tears from all faces.

    Psalms 37:29-The righteous will possess the earth, And they will live forever on it.

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